This Weeks Box 5/21/2011


strawberries
kohlrabbi
baby romaine
mandarin oranges
valencia oranges
lemons
one head of speckled butterhead lettuce
grapefruit
carrots
multi color beets
multi color radishes
handful of potatoes
green onions
bunch of arugula
tangerines

Roasted mixed vegetables recipe

chunk as many of your root vegetables as you want. Especially the kholrabi as it does real well in this recipe.

Make sure to cut or peel the outer layer of the kohlrabi bulb before cutting it in chunks.

Throw everything into boiling water for 1o minutes or so. The water will change color because of the beets but does not hurt anything.

Then transfer the partially cooked roots into a pyrex dish.

Make a dressing with a little honey, some olive oil and juice of a lemon. Stir the honey lemon and oil with a fork and then pour over the root vegetables.

Chop some green onions and sprinkle them over the vegetables before putting into the oven for 20 minutes or so at 400 degrees uncovered.

If you want that caramelized crispy effect, stir the vegetables one time after they are done and turn the oven to broil and wait 5 minutes or so.

Kohlrabi

History:
Kohlrabi came to the United States from Europe. It’s name literally means cabbage-turnip. Kohlrabi can be planted for both spring and fall harvest. It comes in white, actually green, and purple varieties.

Storage:
Store kohlrabi with leaves on to maintain freshness. However, they can be stored sans leaves if you are short on space. Either way, store kohlrabi in your refrigerator crisper. Since they are so bulky, it is usually easier to simply use them right away.

Preparation:
For recipes, trim off root and top, peel until fibrous layer is removed. You also can use leaves. Larger leaves may need to be boiled for a couple of minutes to remove any bitterness.

Kohlrabi can be eaten fresh in sliced, julienned, and grated form, in vegetable platters, salads, and slaws. Alternatively, the roots and greens can be cooked for stews, soups, and gratins.

History:
Kohlrabi came to the United States from Europe. It’s name literally means cabbage-turnip. Kohlrabi can be planted for both spring and fall harvest. It comes in white, actually green, and purple varieties.

Storage:
Store kohlrabi with leaves on to maintain freshness. However, they can be stored sans leaves if you are short on space. Either way, store kohlrabi in your refrigerator crisper. Since they are so bulky, it is usually easier to simply use them right away.

Preparation:
For recipes, trim off root and top, peel until fibrous layer is removed. You also can use leaves. Larger leaves may need to be boiled for a couple of minutes to remove any bitterness.

Kohlrabi can be eaten fresh in sliced, julienned, and grated form, in vegetable platters, salads, and slaws. Alternatively, the roots and greens can be cooked for stews, soups, and gratins.

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