This Weeks Box 6/20/2010



HELLO AGAIN. I THOUGHT I WOULD PUT UP A PICTURE OF LAST YEARS BOX FROM THE MIDDLE OF JUNE. JUDGING BY HOW EVERYTHING IS GROWING THIS YEAR AND ALL OF THE NEWER VARIETIES OF VEGETABLES PLANTED, WE ARE ON TRACK FOR AN EVEN BETTER VARIETY IN OUR SUMMER BOXES.

THE FIRST TOMATOES WILL BE IN THIS WEEKS BOX. THEY ARE AN EARLY “GRAPE TOMATO” VARIETY.

ON A TASTE SCALE OF ONE TO TEN, I WOULD GIVE THEM A SIX OR SO BUT THEY ARE CERTAINLY BETTER THAN ANYTHING AT THE STORE AND AS THE STANDARD VARIETIES START TO COME IN, THE TASTE AND SELECTION GETS BETTER AND BETTER.

GENERALLY AS THE SEASON PROGRESSES, WE OFFER EXTRA TOMATOES AND PEPPERS ABOVE AND BEYOND THE CSA BOX ORDERS FOR A DISCOUNT PRICES TO OUR CSA MEMBERS.

WE WILL ANNOUNCE WHEN THOSE ITEMS BECOME AVAILABLE.

THIS WEEKS GREEN BEANS ARE A DIFFERENT VARIETY THAN LAST WEEKS AND WE HAVE BEEN ENJOYING THEM ALL WEEK. FRESH AND NUTTY WITH LOTS OF FLAVOR.
SAUTEING WITH BUTTER AND SUN DRIED TOMATOES HAS BEEN THE PREFERRED COOKING METHOD.

THE FIRST APRICOTS ARE IN. THEY ARE A LITTLE SMALL COMPARED TO USUAL AND NOT ALL OF THEM WILL BE READY RIGHT AWAY IN THE BOXES. SOME MIGHT STILL NEED A FEW DAYS TO RIPEN UP.

THIS WEEKS BOX:

YELLOW AND OR GREEN ZUCHINI
GREEN BELL PEPPERS
FRESH CRISPY ROMAINE LETTUCE
GRAPE TOMATOES
APRICOTS
GRAPEFRUIT
PINK LEMONS
VALENCIA ORANGES
HAAS AVOCADOS
LEMON THYME
LEMON BALM
GREEN BEANS
GARLIC SPROUTS
ACORN SQUASH
CARROTS
PURPLE BUNCHING ONIONS

Chinese garlic stems, garlic flower stems, green garlic
suan tai (Chinese), shen sum (Korean)
(Allium sativum)

Chinese garlic has a symmetrical bulb in thin purple or silver skin, but has little flavour. Its stems should not be confused with the inedible fibrous tops of curled garlic often found at Farmer’s Markets and specialty markets. These greens are about a foot long and not hollow like the green onions. They are solid and about the width of a pencil. If snapped or cut, the aroma is unmistakably garlic. In China, garlic flower stems are a side product of the garlic bulb of strains known to produce them. The bulbs are cultivated in the usual way, but the flower stems are cut in early summer when they are green and harvested very carefully so that the bulb will not be damaged and can be left to mature. The stems are usually twelve to eighteen inches in length and sold in bundles. They are too strong for most people to use raw; but, if quickly cooked, they are an excellent addition to dishes requiring a hint or two of garlic.


Those that I’ve spoken to either didn’t know about the existence of this veggie, or didn’t know how to prepare it. That’s such a shame because garlic sprouts are highly aromatic, amazingly quick and simple to prepare, and wondrously sweet-tasting. Since they come from the garlic plant, you’ll either love or hate their pungent, garlickly fragrance.

Of course, there are lots of ways you can cook garlic sprouts, but my favorite (and simplest) way is just to saute them till they are sweet and tender. This dish tastes good whether hot or cold. From this basic recipe, you can make variations by adding other ingredients.

Zucchini Lemon Slaw

Ingredients

  • 2 medium zucchini
  • 1 medium carrot
  • 1-1/2 tsp salt
  • 3 green onions, sliced on the bias
  • 2 teaspoons finely grated lemon zest and/or 2 tsp chopped lemon balm or lemon verbena
  • 2 tablespoons lemon juice
  • 3 garlic SPROUTS, minced
  • 1 tablespoon honey
  • 1 tablespoon chopped fresh lemon thyme
  • salt and pepper

Directions

  1. Grate zucchini and carrot coarsely or slice into a julienne on a mandolin. Toss veggies with salt and let sit 30 minutes.
  2. Squeeze out excess liquid and toss vegetables with remaining ingredients, seasoning to taste.
  3. Chill until ready to serve.

Serves 4

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